Antimicrobial drug use program results

RSS

This post courtesy of Anne Taylor-Vaisey :


Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Jun;11(6):904-11.

Clinician knowledge and beliefs after statewide program to promote appropriate antimicrobial drug use. Kiang KM, Kieke BA, Como-Sabetti K, Lynfield R, Besser RE, Belongia EA.

Minnesota Department of Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. In 1999, Wisconsin initiated an educational campaign fo r primary care clinicians and the public to promote judicious antimicrobial drug use. We evaluated its impact on clinician knowledge and beliefs; Minnesota served as a control state. Results of pre- (1999) and post- (2002) campaign questionnaires indicated that Wisconsin clinicians perceived a significant decline in the proportion of patients requesting antimicrobial drugs (50% in 1999 to 30% in 2002; p<0.001) and in antimicrobial drug requests from parents for children (25% in 1999 to 20% in 2002; p = 0.004). Wisconsin clinicians were less influenced by nonpredictive clinical findings (purulent nasal discharge [p = 0.044], productive cough [p = 0.010]) in terms of antimicrobial drug prescribing. In 2002, clinicians from both states were less likely to recommend antimicrobial agent treatment for the adult case scenarios of viral respiratory illness. For the comparable pediatric case scenarios, only Wisconsin clinicians improved significantly from 1999 to 2002. Although clinicians in both states improved on several survey responses, greater overall improvement occurred in Wisconsin.


Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Jun;11(6):912-20.

Impact of statewide program to promote appropriate antimicrobial drug use.

Belongia EA, Knobloch MJ, Kieke BA, Davis JP, Janette C, Besser RE.

Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin 54449, USA. belongia.edward@marshfieldclinic.org The Wisconsin Antibiotic Resistance Network (WARN) was launched in 1999 to educate physicians and the public about judicious antimicrobial drug use. Public education included radio and television advertisements, posters, pamphlets, and presentations at childcare centers. Physician education included mailings, susceptibility reports, practice guidelines, satellite conferences, and presentations. We analyzed antimicrobial prescribing data for primary care physicians in Wisconsin and Minnesota (control state). Antimicrobial prescribing declined 19.8% in Minnesota and 20.4% in Wisconsin from 1998 to 2003. Prescribing by internists declined significantly more in Wisconsin than Minnesota, but the opposite was true for pediatricians. We conclude that the secular trend of declining antimicrobial drug use continued through 2003, but a large-scale educational program did not generate greater reductions in Wisconsin despite improved knowledge. State and local organizations should consider a balanced approach that includes limited statewide educational activities with increasing emphasis on local, provider-level interventions and policy development to promote careful antimicrobial drug use.


Please or Register to post comments.

Blog Archive

Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×