Mentoring works (but you knew that)

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From the December 2004 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine:

Farrell SE, Digioia NM, Broderick KB, Coates WC. Mentoring for clinician-educators. Acad Emerg Med 2004; 11(12):1346-1350.

Abstract: Mentorship has been shown to have a positive impact on academic faculty members in terms of career advancement. The guidance of a mentor has been shown to increase academic outcome measures such as peer-reviewed publications and grant support for junior academic faculty. In addition, career satisfaction of mentored faculty is greater than those with no mentorship. There is little research on the effects of mentorship on the careers of clinician-educators. This group has also been reported to have a lower scholarly productivity rate than the typical research-based faculty. This article addresses the current stat! e of mentorship as it applies specifically to clinician-educators, offers advice on how a potential protege might seek out a potential mentor, and finally, suggests a possible mentoring system for academic emergency physicians who are focusing on careers in medical education.

PubMed

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