Off topic: Tomatoes, terrorism, and global warming

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Here is my entrant into Dr. Charles' tomato contest. Does he not look like a fruit equal to the task of raising public awareness of global warming and then defusing the global threat of terrorism? He's nothing if not green (though he does blush pink in parts, awaiting for the world to understand that while tomatoes like heat, they will not survive global warming in a Massachusetts garden. A few more days on the vine also would have been good). And in his coloring, he also is a symbol of the golden mean, or the "middle between two extremes, one of excess and the other of deficiency," which many see as a root cause of terrorism in the world today. And, of course, the spiral he displays is both a further symbol of the interconnectedness of all things, and thus the futility of trying to solve problems by blowing each other up. His lovely spiral also follows (OK, very loosely) the Fibonacci numbers explained so deliciously in the runaway bestseller, The Da VInci Code. While usually the Nautilus shell is used as an example of this perfection expressed in nature, why should not the humble tomato as well?


In Hopi symbology, "the spiral represents a broadening of consciousness, which is the destination arrived after a long journey," which is something we all need to combat global warming and terrorism. And given that terrorism has so often and so tragically struck at planes, is it a coincidence that the spiral also is painted on jet engines as a safety precaution? In the Wiccan religion, the spiral also is the symbol of the godess, who I'm sure is none too happy about either of the challenges our little tomato has taken on.


Is inspiring us all to consume less energy, conserve the planet, and learn to live in peace too much to ask of a tomato? I think not.


Plus, his friends and neighbors are rooting for him:




P.S. To regular Capsules readers, please humor me on this off-topic post. It is Labor Day weekend, after all, and a girl just has to have fun!

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