What do docs think of online interactive learning?

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This post courtesy of Anne Taylor-Vaisey: Research Question: On-line interactive learning: What are physicians'

perspectives of it? Is it effective?

Articles:

1. Interactive on-line continuing medical education: physicians'

perceptions and experiences

. *Sargeant J, Curran V, Jarvis-Selinger S,

Ferrier S, Allen M, Kirby F, Ho K. /JCEHP /2004;24:227-236. Abstract

2. Effectiveness of case-based on-line learning of evidence-based

practice guidelines

. *Stewart M, Marshall N, Østbye T, Feightner JW,

Brown JB, Harris S, Galajda J. /Fam Med /2005;37:131-8. PubMed Abstract

Summary: Sargeant et al. /conducted interviews and focus groups with

physicians in three provinces to explore their experiences with, and perceptions

of, interactive on-line CME.

Participating physicians had various levels of

experiences with interactive on-line CME, which was reflected in their

responses. The physicians discussed on-line CME in relation to face-to-face CME,

and in addition to previously identified issues related to the advantages of

accessibility and the challenges of technical competency, two other themes

emerged. The first theme, the ability of on-line CME to meet personal learning

preferences, was influenced by the quality of the program, the degree of

self-direction regarding time and content, opportunity for reflection, and

educational design. The second theme, the quality and quantity of interpersonal

interaction, was influenced by social comfort and educational value of

interactions, which were both influenced by the facilitator's role.

Stewart et al./ conducted a randomized controlled trial to

examine the effectiveness of on-line evidence-based case studies on family

physicians' knowledge, quality of practice and targeted behaviours. The

intervention consisted of two learning modules, one on diabetic care for an

older male patient and one on preventive health practices for a perimenopausal

female patient, and a moderated case discussion, each lasting 2 weeks; the

control group was placed on a waiting list to receive the same. The physician

moderator presented the brief case scenario and some questions and during the

two week period, posted relevant questions, added greater details to the case,

provided web-based links, encouraged questions, and summarized discussion

points. Based on the results of knowledge questionnaires, chart audits, and

standardized patients, the intervention group demonstrated significant

improvements in only knowledge and chart-audit scores for the prevention case! .

**

Implications:

* These studies reinforce the value of both qualitative and quantitative

research studies, as well as the need to explore the reasons why physicians'

perceptions of competence do not always translate into changed performance.

* Similar to face-to-face CME, the limited success of on-line CME may be due

to a lack of concurrent organizational-level change.

*1. **Internet continuing education for health care professionals: an

integrative review. *Cobb SC.* */JCEHP/ 2004;24(3):171-80. Abstract

*2. eLearning: a review of Internet-based continuing medical education.

*Wutoh R, Boren SA, Balas EA.* */JCEHP/ 2004;24(1):20-30. Abstract

*Search the RDRB (Research & Development Resource Base):**/ /*For more

articles search the RDRB - Free article online .

Use: online learning OR online CME.

*/Research Digest/* is compiled by Joanne Goldman and Laure Perrier of the

Knowledge Translation Program at the University of Toronto (Link ).

Its goals are to highlight and summarize recent publications, stimulate

discussion and reading, and generate research in the subject area.

*Research Digest #9_05*

This post courtesy of Anne Taylor-Vaisey: Research Question: On-line interactive learning: What are physicians'

perspectives of it? Is it effective?

Articles:

1. Interactive on-line continuing medical education: physicians'

perceptions and experiences

. *Sargeant J, Curran V, Jarvis-Selinger S,

Ferrier S, Allen M, Kirby F, Ho K. /JCEHP /2004;24:227-236. Abstract

2. Effectiveness of case-based on-line learning of evidence-based

practice guidelines

. *Stewart M, Marshall N, Østbye T, Feightner JW,

Brown JB, Harris S, Galajda J. /Fam Med /2005;37:131-8. PubMed Abstract

Summary: Sargeant et al. /conducted interviews and focus groups with

physicians in three provinces to explore their experiences with, and perceptions

of, interactive on-line CME.

Participating physicians had various levels of

experiences with interactive on-line CME, which was reflected in their

responses. The physicians discussed on-line CME in relation to face-to-face CME,

and in addition to previously identified issues related to the advantages of

accessibility and the challenges of technical competency, two other themes

emerged. The first theme, the ability of on-line CME to meet personal learning

preferences, was influenced by the quality of the program, the degree of

self-direction regarding time and content, opportunity for reflection, and

educational design. The second theme, the quality and quantity of interpersonal

interaction, was influenced by social comfort and educational value of

interactions, which were both influenced by the facilitator's role.

Stewart et al./ conducted a randomized controlled trial to

examine the effectiveness of on-line evidence-based case studies on family

physicians' knowledge, quality of practice and targeted behaviours. The

intervention consisted of two learning modules, one on diabetic care for an

older male patient and one on preventive health practices for a perimenopausal

female patient, and a moderated case discussion, each lasting 2 weeks; the

control group was placed on a waiting list to receive the same. The physician

moderator presented the brief case scenario and some questions and during the

two week period, posted relevant questions, added greater details to the case,

provided web-based links, encouraged questions, and summarized discussion

points. Based on the results of knowledge questionnaires, chart audits, and

standardized patients, the intervention group demonstrated significant

improvements in only knowledge and chart-audit scores for the prevention case! .

**

Implications:

* These studies reinforce the value of both qualitative and quantitative

research studies, as well as the need to explore the reasons why physicians'

perceptions of competence do not always translate into changed performance.

* Similar to face-to-face CME, the limited success of on-line CME may be due

to a lack of concurrent organizational-level change.

*1. **Internet continuing education for health care professionals: an

integrative review. *Cobb SC.* */JCEHP/ 2004;24(3):171-80. Abstract

*2. eLearning: a review of Internet-based continuing medical education.

*Wutoh R, Boren SA, Balas EA.* */JCEHP/ 2004;24(1):20-30. Abstract

*Search the RDRB (Research & Development Resource Base):**/ /*For more

articles search the RDRB - Free article online .

Use: online learning OR online CME.

*/Research Digest/* is compiled by Joanne Goldman and Laure Perrier of the

Knowledge Translation Program at the University of Toronto (Link ).

Its goals are to highlight and summarize recent publications, stimulate

discussion and reading, and generate research in the subject area.

*Research Digest #9_05*

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