Recently, students in a meeting planning course at the University of New Hampshire disappointed their professor when they were clueless about how to articulate a business strategy. The assignment: create a fictitious company, identify strategic goals for that company, and then discuss how corporate meetings could support the business strategy. For example, strategic goals for a U.S.-based life insurance company might include “expanding sales of life insurance policies into China and ...

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