• Criterion 30—Works with Other Healthcare Disciplines or Other Elements of Healthcare on Local, National, or Global Initiatives intended to improve health or healthcare. This criterion, which is similar to current Criterion 20 (collaboration), would eventually replace it.  Criterion 30 encourages organizations and professionals to cooperate or collaborate with each other in a stronger, more empowered enterprise. The principles of collaboration and cooperation could apply to multiple departments or divisions within a larger complex health system or between the provider’s organization and one or more stakeholders related to the goal of the educational activity or curriculum. In addition, this criterion requires a demonstration of how the provider takes responsibility for jointly provided activities. Note: While this new criterion is essentially a replacement for Criterion 20, it has evolved into a clearer statement of intent on the ACCME’s part and also incorporates the requirement for control over jointly provided CME, which was previously contained in Criterion 22.

• Criterion 31—Utilizes Strategies to Enhance Change as an adjunct to its CME activities. This criterion, which may eventually supplant existing Criteria 17 (ancillary tools) and 19 (barriers to physician change), encourages providers to use strategies such as reminders and patient feedback to remove, overcome, or address barriers to physician change. Note: This new criterion amalgamates the existing Criteria 17 and 19 and may eliminate Criterion 18. It links the concepts of designing ancillary tools and support materials to assist learners in reaching the results intended for the activity. It does so with an understanding of other barriers to implementation experienced by targeted learners. It drives planners to analyze data and their own experiences to address what is needed to make the activity impactful and achieve the desired result.

• Criterion 32—Implementation of a Research Design and Publication Strategy in the Evaluation of CME. This new criterion will be of interest to providers that see continuing professional development, or CPD, as actively researching new ways to advance the arena of CME through scholarly pursuits.

• Criterion 33—CME Program Leadership Engages in Continuing Professional Development. This criterion seeks to encourage the leadership of an accredited provider to participate in its own CPD throughout the year in domains relevant to the CME enterprise. Note: While many providers engage in periodic in-service training for staff, this criterion recognizes the value of providers’ ongoing professional improvement, not only to their own program staff but to the rest of the leadership team in the CME enterprise.

• Criterion 34—Creativity and Innovation in the Development and Delivery of CME. This is an open-ended criterion in which the ACCME will subjectively judge compliance relevant to the CME program’s uniqueness or impact for improving efficiency.